Dr. Margery C. Carlson: Botanist, Professor, and Conservationist

Margery Carlson (1892-1985) Botany Research Associate shown [outdoors] with some of the packs of [plant] specimens she collected on expedition. © The Field Museum, B80585.

  “Every collector hopes that he will be able to bring home some species unknown to science, never before described or even given a botanical name.” – Margery Carlson¹ An Auspicious Beginning Dr. Margery C. Carlson was born in November 21, 1892 in Arthur, Illinois.²,³ She was named after the marguerite Continue Reading

Yvette Borup Andrews: First Asiatic Zoological Expedition of the American Museum of Natural History

Yvette Borup Andrews with squirrel, China, September 20, 1916,” Research Library | Digital Special Collections, accessed July 10, 2018, http-::lbry-web-007.amnh.org:digital:items:show:74486.

In 1891, Yvette Borup was born to Mary Brandreth and Col. Henry Borup in Paris, France¹. Though both parents were American, Borup would spent the majority of her early life in Europe, as her father was a military attache in France, then later Germany. During her time in Germany, Borup Continue Reading

Libbie Henrietta Hyman: Invertebrate Zoologist

Libbie Hyman was one of the most influential vertebrate and invertebrate zoologists of all time.  She single-handedly wrote and illustrated an unprecedented six-volume, 4,000-page treatise on approximately 1 million invertebrates. “ …Whole academies in more than one country have attempted to do what she has done. The debt of every zoologist Continue Reading

Olive Muriel Pink: Artist, Conservationist, Aboriginal Rights Activist

Olive Muriel Pink would spent a decade conducting research on the eastern Arrernte of Alice Springs and the Warlpiri of the Tanami region. She grew to be a passionate activist for aboriginal rights (in fact, historian Julie Marcus suggests that Pink ultimately left academia because she felt it was not serving her activist goals).

Ethel King: Fish Artist Extraordinaire

Preparation of a Queensland groper by Ethel King 1926. Photographer George C. Clutton. Australian Museum Archives AMS351_V09193. Reproduction Rights Australian Museum

In the 1920’s a group of women artists, working mostly on commission and in insecure, part-time positions, helped create a new visual identity for the Australian Museum. They used their training in applied art and design to produce innovative and colorful natural history dioramas, and their illustrations of museum specimens Continue Reading

Mina Benson Hubbard: Labrador Mapping Expedition

Mina Hubbard: The Woman Who Mapped Labrador

In an epic story of love, trials, and vindication at the dawn of the 20th century, the farm-raised daughter of European immigrants to Canada became the first white woman to explore and map the backcountry of Labrador. An Unexpected Pioneer Mina Benson Hubbard’s background gave no indication of her pioneering Continue Reading

Matthew Henson: Explorer, Scientist

Featured Image: Matthew Henson in Greenland in 1901.    “My thoughts were on the going and getting forward, and on nothing else.” -Matthew Henson, explorer, scientist1, 2, 3, 4 A member of the first expedition to reach the North Pole, Matthew Alexander Henson was an experienced member of several polar Continue Reading

Amanda Almira Newton: Botanical Illustrator for the US Department of Agriculture

U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705

Amanda Almira Newton was a prolific illustrator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) who specialized in drawing watercolors of fruit. She contributed more than 1200 watercolor paintings to the USDA and also made more than 300 wax models of fruits. Her precise and detailed drawings were especially important in Continue Reading